When:
August 1, 2019 @ 7:30 pm
2019-08-01T19:30:00+10:00
2019-08-01T19:45:00+10:00
Where:
Kadimah
7 Selwyn St
Elsternwick VIC 3185
Australia
Cost:
$25 / $20 Members and Concession / $10 Full-time Students

Please join us as David Slucki, Bram Presser, Jordy Silverstein discuss the challenges of reconstructing difficult family histories. David’s new book, Sing This at My Funeral: A Memoir of Fathers and Sons tells the story of his father, Sluggo, his grandfather, Jakub, and the grave legacy that they each passed on to him. In Bram Presser’s The Book of Dirt: A Novel, Presser creates his grandparents’ Holocaust story out of family history, imagination, old photographs, and ephemera. The discussion will be moderated by historian Jordy Silverstein, whose work investigates Australian Jewish memory and identity.

Jointly presented by the Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation and the Kadimah

Bram Presser is a semi-reformed punk rocker, recovering academic, lapsed criminal lawyer, and one-time cartoon character. His debut novel, The Book of Dirt, won the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction, UTS Glenda Adams Award for New Writing and People’s Choice Award at the 2018 NSW Premier’s Literary Awards. It also won the 2018 Voss Literary Award and, most recently, the 2018 National Jewish Book Award for Debut Fiction in the USA.

Jordy Silverstein is a historian and writer. She works at the University of Melbourne, researching histories of Australian Jewish memory and identity, as well as Australian refugee and migrant histories. She is the author of Anxious Histories: Narrating the Holocaust in Jewish Communities at the Beginning of the Twenty-First Century.

David Slucki is an author and historian based in Charleston, South Carolina, where he is an Assistant Professor in Jewish Studies at the College of Charleston. He is the author of Sing This at My Funeral: A Memoir of Fathers and Sons, and The International Jewish Labor Bund after 1945: Toward a Global History and co-editor of In the Shadows of Memory: The Holocaust and the Third Generation, and Laughter After: Humor and the Holocaust.